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How should I get ready for the future in regards to early-onset Alzheimer's disease?

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If you have early-onset Alzheimer's disease, there are plans you can make now that will be a big help later. For example, meet with a lawyer to learn about the arrangements you'll need. Giving someone power of attorney, which lets someone you love make health and money decisions for you when you can no longer do that on your own.

It's also a good idea to think about how you'll pay for some of your future health costs. Some things to consider are safety equipment you'll need at home or getting help from a professional caregiver. Get your family together to talk about your finances, and how much money you're likely to need to get proper care.

Now is also the time to start building your team. Lots of different people will be on it. Your relatives, friends, neighbors, and health professionals all have a role. Your family and your doctor can help you put a group together.

The important thing is to figure out what you want, make a specific, realistic plan, and to let people around you know.

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's," "Alzheimer's changes the whole brain," "Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia," "Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease," "If you have younger-onset Alzheimer's," "Risk Factors," "The Search for Alzheimer’s Causes and Risk Factors," "Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease," "Treatments for Sleep Disturbances," "Younger/Early Onset Alzheimer's & Dementia."

Cleveland Clinic: "Living with early-onset."

Keith N. Fargo, PhD, Alzheimer's Association, Chicago.

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease."

Richard Lipton, MD, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York City.

National Institute on Aging: "About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes," "Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on May 5, 2019

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's," "Alzheimer's changes the whole brain," "Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia," "Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease," "If you have younger-onset Alzheimer's," "Risk Factors," "The Search for Alzheimer’s Causes and Risk Factors," "Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease," "Treatments for Sleep Disturbances," "Younger/Early Onset Alzheimer's & Dementia."

Cleveland Clinic: "Living with early-onset."

Keith N. Fargo, PhD, Alzheimer's Association, Chicago.

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease."

Richard Lipton, MD, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York City.

National Institute on Aging: "About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes," "Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on May 5, 2019

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