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How should I help a person with Alzheimer's disease eat?

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  • Keep mealtime simple and calm. Turn off the TV and radio. Move unneeded items off the table. If need be, serve one thing at a time.
  • Use solid-colored plates on a contrasting place mat so it's easier to tell food from their plate and the table.
  • Don't hurry. Be patient.
  • As it becomes harder for him to eat on his own, try finger foods like tuna sandwiches, steamed broccoli pieces, or orange segments. If swallowing is hard, serve softer foods like applesauce, cottage cheese, and scrambled eggs.

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Food, Eating and Alzheimer's," “Activities at Home."

Cleveland Clinic: "Exercise and Alzheimer's Disease."

Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation: "Mental Stimulation Slows Alzheimer's Progression."

National Institute on Aging: "Caring for a Person with Alzheimer's Disease."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on April 14, 2018

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Food, Eating and Alzheimer's," “Activities at Home."

Cleveland Clinic: "Exercise and Alzheimer's Disease."

Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation: "Mental Stimulation Slows Alzheimer's Progression."

National Institute on Aging: "Caring for a Person with Alzheimer's Disease."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on April 14, 2018

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How should I help a patient with Alzheimer's disease with activities.

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