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What are the symptoms of late Alzheimer's disease?

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The third stage, also known as late Alzheimer's, is the most severe. It typically lasts 1 to 3 years.

People in this phase might have some or all of these symptoms:

  • Major confusion about what’s in the past and what’s happening now
  • Can’t express themselves, remember, or process information
  • Problems with swallowing and control of their bladder and bowels
  • Weight loss, seizures, skin infections, and other illnesses
  • Extreme mood swings
  • Seeing, hearing, or feeling things that aren’t really there, called hallucinations
  • Can’t move easily on their own

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "10 Early signs & Symptoms of Alzheimer's" and "Principles for a Dignified Diagnosis."

Helpguide.org: "Alzheimer's Disease."

Alzheimer's Disease Research: "Alzheimer's Symptoms & Stages.

National Institute on Aging: "About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms."

Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation: "Top Ten Alzheimer's Signs and Symptoms."

 

Reviewed by Neil Lava on February 03, 2019

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "10 Early signs & Symptoms of Alzheimer's" and "Principles for a Dignified Diagnosis."

Helpguide.org: "Alzheimer's Disease."

Alzheimer's Disease Research: "Alzheimer's Symptoms & Stages.

National Institute on Aging: "About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms."

Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation: "Top Ten Alzheimer's Signs and Symptoms."

 

Reviewed by Neil Lava on February 03, 2019

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How do I know the difference of Alzheimer's disease from normal aging?

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