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What are the symptoms of Lewy body dementia (LBD)?

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Not everyone will have the same warning signs of Lewy body dementia. They often depend on the type of LBD you have. They might be mild or get worse at times.

Like other types of dementia, LBD causes changes in your thinking, mood, behavior, movement, and sleep. Symptoms include:

  • Trouble making decisions, judging distances, multitasking, planning, organizing, or remembering
  • Losing concentration
  • Staring into space
  • Hallucinations
  • Shuffling or slow walk
  • Balance problems or falling a lot
  • Stiff muscles
  • Tremors or shaking hands
  • Stooped posture
  • REM sleep behavior disorder (acting out dreams, including making violent movements during sleep or falling out of bed)
  • Sleeping a lot during the daytime (as much as 2 hours every day)
  • Trouble falling or staying asleep
  • The urge to move your legs when you’re at rest, called restless legs syndrome
  • Depression or lack of interest
  • Anxiety
  • Delusions, such as thinking a relative or friend is an imposter

From: What Is Lewy Body Dementia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Lewy Body Dementia Association.

National Institute on Aging.

University of California, San Francisco: “Lewy Body Dementias.”

Alzheimer’s Association.

 

Reviewed by Neil Lava on May 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Lewy Body Dementia Association.

National Institute on Aging.

University of California, San Francisco: “Lewy Body Dementias.”

Alzheimer’s Association.

 

Reviewed by Neil Lava on May 19, 2019

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How is Lewy body dementia (LBD) diagnosed?

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