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What are the symptoms of Pick's disease?

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People with Pick's disease may:

Some people become hungry all the time, and some develop an unhealthy "sweet tooth" and eat much more sugar than they should.

They might also have:

  • Act aggressively toward others
  • Be uninterested in everyday activities
  • Be very aware of everything you do all the time
  • Feel irritable or agitated
  • Have drastic and quick mood swings
  • Have trouble feeling warmth, sympathy, or concern for others
  • Have trouble with unplanned activities
  • Make rash decisions
  • Repeat actions over and over
  • Say and do inappropriate things
  • Memory loss
  • Problems moving
  • Stiff or weak muscles
  • Trouble peeing
  • Trouble with coordination

From: What Is Pick's Disease? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Brain Tour," "Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)."

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration: "Pick's Disease."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Frontotemporal Dementia." 

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Frontotemporal Degeneration."

Medscape: "Pick Disease."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on November 15, 2018

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Brain Tour," "Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)."

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration: "Pick's Disease."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Frontotemporal Dementia." 

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Frontotemporal Degeneration."

Medscape: "Pick Disease."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on November 15, 2018

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Can Pick's disease cause speech problems?

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