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What can I do to help my loved one with Alzheimer's disease to get the right amount of food to eat?

ANSWER

  • Talk to your loved one's doctor to see if the reason is something treatable, like depression.
  • Don't force your loved one to eat.
  • Serve healthy foods with different textures, colors, and temperatures.
  • Offer smaller meals more often instead of three large ones.
  • Encourage physical activity, which boosts appetite.
  • Serve finger foods that are easy to handle and eat.
  • Use colorful place settings or play background music.
  • Try not to let your loved one eat alone.

SOURCES:

National Institute on Aging: "Caring for a Person with Alzheimer's Disease."

Alzheimer's Association: "Daily Care" and "Treatment Horizon."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Ginkgo."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on March 10, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute on Aging: "Caring for a Person with Alzheimer's Disease."

Alzheimer's Association: "Daily Care" and "Treatment Horizon."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Ginkgo."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on March 10, 2018

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How can I help someone with Alzheimer's disease who is getting more confused?

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