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What conditions can contribute to memory loss?

ANSWER

In most cases, there’s no great cause for worry. Just because you lose your keys or forget someone’s name doesn’t mean you have Alzheimer’s. You could have memory loss due to the normal aging process.

Conditions that contribute to memory loss include:

  • Depression
  • Medication side effects
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Not enough vitamin B12 or a low thyroid level
  • Stress and worry of any kind, such as from the death of a spouse or loved one, or from retirement
  • Illness

From: Is It Alzheimer’s or Normal Aging? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: "Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia," "Know the 10 Signs."

Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center: “Alzheimer’s Disease Fact Sheet.”

Mayo Clinic: “Memory Loss: 7 tips to improve your memory,” “Memory Loss: When to Seek Help,” “Reversible Causes of Memory Loss.”

National Institute on Aging: “About Alzheimer’s."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on December 16, 2018

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: "Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia," "Know the 10 Signs."

Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center: “Alzheimer’s Disease Fact Sheet.”

Mayo Clinic: “Memory Loss: 7 tips to improve your memory,” “Memory Loss: When to Seek Help,” “Reversible Causes of Memory Loss.”

National Institute on Aging: “About Alzheimer’s."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on December 16, 2018

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What is one symptom of more serious memory loss?

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