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What happens to people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease?

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The damage from Alzheimer’s disease usually starts in the area of your brain that forms memories. People with early-stage Alzheimer's often have trouble remembering things. As the disease gets worse, the plaques and clusters also appear in the parts of the brain in charge of bodily behaviors.

Everyday activities like walking, eating, going to the bathroom, and talking become harder.

From: What Alzheimer's Does to Your Body WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on December 10, 2017

Medically Reviewed on 12/10/2017

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association.

American Academy of Family Physicians: "What are the complications of Alzheimer's disease?"

National Institute on Aging: "Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery."

University of California, San Francisco: "Alzheimer's disease."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Alzheimer's disease."

Wang, L. , May 2006. Archives of Internal Medicine

Reviewed by Neil Lava on December 10, 2017

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association.

American Academy of Family Physicians: "What are the complications of Alzheimer's disease?"

National Institute on Aging: "Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery."

University of California, San Francisco: "Alzheimer's disease."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Alzheimer's disease."

Wang, L. , May 2006. Archives of Internal Medicine

Reviewed by Neil Lava on December 10, 2017

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What is the life expectancy with Alzheimer's disease?

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