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What is Huntington's disease?

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Huntington's disease is caused by a problem with a gene you get from one of your parents. It affects the central part of your brain -- the area that helps you think, move, and show emotion.

Symptoms typically start between ages 30 and 50, and uncontrolled arm, leg, head, face, and upper body movements are the first signs. The brain changes also lead to problems with memory, concentration, judgment, reasoning, and planning. People with Huntington’s disease also have issues with depression, anger, and irritability. There’s no known cure for it.

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: “Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease,” “Frontotemporal Dementia,” “Type of Dementia,” “What is Alzheimer’s?”

Alzheimer’s Disease International: “World Alzheimer’s Report 2015.”

Alzheimer’s Society: “Sight, perception and hallucinations in dementia.”

BrightFocus Foundation: “What’s The Difference Between Dementia & Alzheimer’s Disease?”

Dementia Society of America: “Dementia FAQs.”

Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation: “Dementia vs. Alzheimer’s.”

Visiting Nurse Association of Ohio: “Alzheimer’s Versus Dementia.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on December 26, 2016

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: “Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease,” “Frontotemporal Dementia,” “Type of Dementia,” “What is Alzheimer’s?”

Alzheimer’s Disease International: “World Alzheimer’s Report 2015.”

Alzheimer’s Society: “Sight, perception and hallucinations in dementia.”

BrightFocus Foundation: “What’s The Difference Between Dementia & Alzheimer’s Disease?”

Dementia Society of America: “Dementia FAQs.”

Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation: “Dementia vs. Alzheimer’s.”

Visiting Nurse Association of Ohio: “Alzheimer’s Versus Dementia.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on December 26, 2016

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