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What role does genetics play in Alzheimer's disease?

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We don’t know exactly what causes Alzheimer's disease, but scientists know that genes are involved. Genes are the blueprint that tells your body what color your eyes should be or if you’re likely to get some kinds of diseases.

You get your genes from your parents. They come grouped in long strands of DNA called chromosomes. Every healthy person is born with 46 chromosomes in 23 pairs. Researchers have found evidence of a link between Alzheimer's disease and genes on four chromosomes, labeled as 1, 14, 19, and 21.

From: Is Alzheimer's Disease Genetic? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Alzheimer's Association. 

National Center for Biotechnology Information.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on April 23, 2017

SOURCES: 

Alzheimer's Association. 

National Center for Biotechnology Information.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on April 23, 2017

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What is early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease?

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