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What tests are used to diagnose Pick's disease?

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To get a better picture of what's happening in your brain, your doctor may order imaging tests, such as:

You may also have a lumbar puncture. Your doctor will use a long needle to take a small amount of fluid from an area near your spine for screening. In rare cases, your doctor might want to take a small amount of your brain tissue to test. This is called a biopsy.

  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Powerful magnets and radio waves are used to make detailed images of your brain.
  • Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or a positron emission tomography (PET) scan: A radioactive substance and a special camera create 3-dimensional pictures that show what areas of your brain are more or less active.

From: What Is Pick's Disease? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Brain Tour," "Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)."

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration: "Pick's Disease."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Frontotemporal Dementia." 

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Frontotemporal Degeneration."

Medscape: "Pick Disease."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on November 15, 2018

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Brain Tour," "Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)."

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration: "Pick's Disease."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Frontotemporal Dementia." 

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Frontotemporal Degeneration."

Medscape: "Pick Disease."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on November 15, 2018

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How is Pick's disease treated?

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