PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are treatments for agoraphobia?

ANSWER

There are many drugs your doctor might suggest for agoraphobia. The most common kinds are antidepressants and anti-anxiety medicines. Doctors often start with a low dose of one of these medicines that raises the level of a "feel-good" chemical in your brain, called serotonin. Some of the medications that raise serotonin are Celexa, Effexor, Zoloft, Lexapro, and Prozac.

You'll probably take medicine for at least 6 months to a year. If you feel better and no longer are stressed when you're in places that used to scare you, your doctor may begin tapering off your medicine.

Lifestyle changes may also help. Exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet. Skip caffeine and alcohol. They can make your symptoms worse.

From: What Is Agoraphobia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Anxiety and Depression Association of America: "Panic Disorder & Agoraphobia."

Medscape: "Phobic Disorders."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Panic Disorder."

NHS: "Agoraphobia."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on July 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Anxiety and Depression Association of America: "Panic Disorder & Agoraphobia."

Medscape: "Phobic Disorders."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Panic Disorder."

NHS: "Agoraphobia."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on July 11, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What are the symptoms of panic attacks?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: