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How can you get pain relief from gout flare-ups without medication?

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Along with medication, try these tips to ease your symptoms:

  • Use cold. If your pain isn't too bad, try cold packs or compresses on the joint to lower inflammation and soothe the ache. Wrap the ice in a thin towel and apply to the joint for 20 to 30 minutes several times a day. (Do not apply ice to your hands or feet if you have nerve problems from diabetes or other causes.
  • Rest the joint. It's a good idea to rest it until the pain eases up. You probably won't want to move it much anyway. If you can, raise the joint on a pillow or other soft object.
  • Drink water. When your body doesn’t have enough water, your uric acid levels rise even higher. Stay hydrated to keep those levels normal.
  • Watch what you eat and drink. Foods that are high in substances called purines, such as some seafood, organ meats like liver, and fatty foods, can raise the uric acid in your blood even more. So can fructose-sweetened drinks and alcohol -- especially beer.

From: How to Treat Gout Attacks at Home WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Rebecca Manno, MD, MHS, assistant professor of medicine, division of rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Robert T. Keenan, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine, division of rheumatology and immunology, Duke University School of Medicine.

Scott Zashin, MD, clinical professor of medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School; attending physician, Presbyterian Hospital.

Lan Chen, MD, PhD, attending rheumatologist, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center.

Gout and Pseudogout Treatment & Management: "Treatment."

Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Gout -- Treatments for Gout."

Merck Manual: "Gout."

Arthritis Foundation: "Managing a Gout Attack."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on April 02, 2019

SOURCES:

Rebecca Manno, MD, MHS, assistant professor of medicine, division of rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Robert T. Keenan, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine, division of rheumatology and immunology, Duke University School of Medicine.

Scott Zashin, MD, clinical professor of medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School; attending physician, Presbyterian Hospital.

Lan Chen, MD, PhD, attending rheumatologist, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center.

Gout and Pseudogout Treatment & Management: "Treatment."

Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Gout -- Treatments for Gout."

Merck Manual: "Gout."

Arthritis Foundation: "Managing a Gout Attack."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on April 02, 2019

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