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How do corticosteroids help treat ankylosing spondylitis (AS)?

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If you have severe inflammation in a joint (called a flare), your doctor may give you a shot of corticosteroid in that spot. These drugs are also called steroids.

A steroid shot may give you short-term relief from pain and swelling in your joint. Your doctor can inject steroids into the joints, including your sacroiliac (where your lower back meets your pelvis), knee, or hip joint. While these can help, you don’t want to rely on them as your main treatment.

From: Medications for Ankylosing Spondylitis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Questions and Answers About Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Spondylitis Association of America: “Medications Used to Treat Ankylosing Spondylitis and Related Diseases.”

Sieper, J. , Published online 2009. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

Spondylitis Association of America: “Alternative Treatments.”

Harvard Medical School Patient Education Center: “Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Arthritis Society of Canada: “Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on December 14, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Questions and Answers About Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Spondylitis Association of America: “Medications Used to Treat Ankylosing Spondylitis and Related Diseases.”

Sieper, J. , Published online 2009. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

Spondylitis Association of America: “Alternative Treatments.”

Harvard Medical School Patient Education Center: “Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Arthritis Society of Canada: “Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on December 14, 2018

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How do biologics help treat anklyosing spondilitis?

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