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How is ankylosing spondylitis diagnosed?

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To diagnose ankylosing spondylitis, your doctor will ask about your symptoms and do tests. A physical exam can show signs of inflammation in your joints or limited back movement. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history and find out if your parents or other relatives had the condition. You may see a specialist called a rheumatologist (an arthritis doctor) to diagnose or treat your AS.

Tests used to diagnose AS include:

  • X-ray
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to look for swelling and inflammation in your sacroiliac joints where your spine connects to your pelvis.
  • CT scan
  • Blood tests for the HLA-B27 gene or signs of inflammation

From: Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: “Spondyloarthritis.”

Spondylitis Association of America: “Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Harvard Medical School Patient Education Center: “What is ankylosing spondylitis?”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Questions and Answers About Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Spondylitis Association of America: “What is axial spondyloarthritis?”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on April 14, 2019

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: “Spondyloarthritis.”

Spondylitis Association of America: “Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Harvard Medical School Patient Education Center: “What is ankylosing spondylitis?”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Questions and Answers About Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Ankylosing Spondylitis.”

Spondylitis Association of America: “What is axial spondyloarthritis?”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on April 14, 2019

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What are treatments for ankylosing spondylitis?

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