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How is chemotherapy used to treat arthritis different from chemotherapy used to treat cancer?

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In cancer treatment, chemotherapy refers to a class of drugs used to kill rapidly multiplying cells or to slow down how fast they reproduce. In rheumatology (a branch of medicine that diagnoses and treats diseases like arthritis), instead of killing cells, chemotherapy is designed to lessen the abnormal behavior of cells. The doses of medication used for rheumatic or autoimmune conditions are generally lower than the doses used for cancer treatment.

From: Chemotherapy Drugs Used to Treat Arthritis WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 09/13/2018

SOURCE: American College of Rheumatology.

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

SOURCE: American College of Rheumatology.

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

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How does chemotherapy treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases?

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