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How is Lyme disease diagnosed?

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If your doctor suspects that you have Lyme disease, she may order two blood tests. These tests are:

ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test. This test can’t check for the bacteria that causes Lyme disease.

Western blot test. This uses electricity to split certain proteins in your blood into patterns. This is then compared to the pattern of people known to have Lyme disease.

Lyme disease is called “The Great Imitator” because it mimics so many different health conditions. Your doctor may also want to do more tests to rule them out.

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Lyme Disease.”

LymeDisease.org: “About Lyme Disease,” “Lyme Disease Diagnosis.”

Lyme Research Alliance: “Diagnostic Dilemma: A Guide: The Diagnostic Dilemma of Lyme Disease.”

CDC: “Lyme Disease: Diagnosis and Testing,” “Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease,” “Lyme Disease: Two-Step Laboratory Testing Process.”

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: “Lyme Disease Diagnostics Research.”

American Lyme Disease Foundation: “How To Find a Physician To Treat Lyme Disease.”

Reviewed by David Zelman on March 31, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Lyme Disease.”

LymeDisease.org: “About Lyme Disease,” “Lyme Disease Diagnosis.”

Lyme Research Alliance: “Diagnostic Dilemma: A Guide: The Diagnostic Dilemma of Lyme Disease.”

CDC: “Lyme Disease: Diagnosis and Testing,” “Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease,” “Lyme Disease: Two-Step Laboratory Testing Process.”

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: “Lyme Disease Diagnostics Research.”

American Lyme Disease Foundation: “How To Find a Physician To Treat Lyme Disease.”

Reviewed by David Zelman on March 31, 2017

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