PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Is osteoarthritis a type of inflammatory rheumatism?

ANSWER

Yes. Osteoarthritis is a type of inflammatory rheumatism or rheumatic disorder. These conditions include many different forms of arthritis that lead to painful, swollen joints. They can also affect bones, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, and muscles. Some can even involve your organs.

You get osteoarthritis when cartilage in your joints wears down over time or due to an injury. It usually affects the hands, knees, hips, and spine.

Doctors most often treat this condition with pain relievers like Tylenol or ibuprofen. They may also suggest physical therapy to strengthen the muscles around the joint and occupational therapy to teach you how to do everyday tasks without putting stress on the joint.

Experts say there are more than 200 rheumatic disorders, including:

Most of these conditions happen when your immune system goes awry and attacks your own tissues. Doctors aren’t sure what causes this. Sometimes it’s in your genes. Other times it’s a result of something in the world around you, like cigarette smoke, pollution, or something that causes an infection. Gender also plays a role -- rheumatic diseases seem to affect women more than men. Most rheumatic diseases affect adults, but children can get them too.

  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Psoriatic arthritis
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis
  • Spondyloarthritis
  • Gout
  • Lupus
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Scleroderma
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Lyme disease
  • Sjögren's syndrome
  • Vasculitis

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Rheumatoid Arthritis,” “Juvenile Arthritis.”

Eular.org: “10 things you should know about rheumatic diseases.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Infectious Arthritis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Fibromyalgia,” “Rheumatoid Arthritis,” “Osteoarthritis,” “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Harvard Health: “Chronic Lyme arthritis: A mystery solved?”

American College of Rheumatology: “Rheumatic diseases in America: the problem, the impact, and the answers,” “Osteoarthritis,” “Juvenile Arthritis,” “Spondyloarthritis,” “Gout,” “Lupus,” Fibromyalgia,” “Scleroderma,” “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome,” “Lyme Disease,” “Sjogren’s Syndrome,” “Vasculitis,” “What is a Rheumatologist?”

UpToDate: “Undifferentiated early inflammatory arthritis in adults.”

Reviewed by Gabriela Pichardo on April 30, 2020

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Rheumatoid Arthritis,” “Juvenile Arthritis.”

Eular.org: “10 things you should know about rheumatic diseases.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Infectious Arthritis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Fibromyalgia,” “Rheumatoid Arthritis,” “Osteoarthritis,” “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Harvard Health: “Chronic Lyme arthritis: A mystery solved?”

American College of Rheumatology: “Rheumatic diseases in America: the problem, the impact, and the answers,” “Osteoarthritis,” “Juvenile Arthritis,” “Spondyloarthritis,” “Gout,” “Lupus,” Fibromyalgia,” “Scleroderma,” “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome,” “Lyme Disease,” “Sjogren’s Syndrome,” “Vasculitis,” “What is a Rheumatologist?”

UpToDate: “Undifferentiated early inflammatory arthritis in adults.”

Reviewed by Gabriela Pichardo on April 30, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

Is psoriatic arthritis a type of inflammatory rheumatism?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.