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What are different phases of clinical trials for arthritis?

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Clinical trials are done in phases:

Phase I: A small number of people are given the new arthritis treatment. The researchers decide the best way to give it and how much of it can be given safely.

Phase II: Determines how people responded to treatment and usually the best dosage.

Phase III: The drug or treatment is given to large groups of people to confirm that it works, monitor side effects, compare it to commonly used treatments, and collect information that will allow the drug or treatment to be used

Phase IV: The new therapy is released to the market. Data is collected on how the drug affects different populations and if there are side effects with long-term use.

SOURCES:

ClinicalTrials.gov

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

SOURCES:

ClinicalTrials.gov

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

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What are advantages of joining a clinical trials for arthritis?

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