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What causes arthritis?

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With many forms of arthritis, the cause is unknown. But some things can raise your chances of getting it.

  • Age. As you get older, your joints tend to get worn down.
  • Gender. Most types of arthritis are more common among women, except for gout.
  • Genes. Conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and ankylosing spondylitis are linked to certain genes.
  • Excess weight. Carrying extra pounds makes arthritis in the knee start sooner and get worse faster.
  • Injuries. They can cause joint damage that can bring on some types of the condition.
  • Infection. Bacteria, viruses, or fungi can infect joints and trigger inflammation.
  • Work. If you go hard on your knees at work -- knee bends and squats -- you might be more likely to get osteoarthritis.

From: The Basics of Arthritis WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 10, 2019

Medically Reviewed on 9/10/2019

SOURCES:

CDC: “Arthritis.”

Arthritis Foundation

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Arthritis.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Arthritis.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “What Is Gout?”

American College of Rheumatology: “Gout.”

NIH Senior Health: “Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 10, 2019

SOURCES:

CDC: “Arthritis.”

Arthritis Foundation

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Arthritis.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Arthritis.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “What Is Gout?”

American College of Rheumatology: “Gout.”

NIH Senior Health: “Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 10, 2019

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What are symptoms of arthritis?

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