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What happens during an X-ray for arthritis?

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The X-ray machine will send a beam of ionizing radiation through an X-ray tube. This energy passes through the part of the body being X-rayed and is then absorbed on film or a digital camera to create a picture. Bones and other dense areas show up as lighter shades of gray to white, while areas that don't absorb the radiation appear as dark gray to black.

The entire test takes no more than 10 to 15 minutes.

You will feel no discomfort from the X-ray test.

From: Arthritis and X-Rays WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE: Radiological Society of North America.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on July 30, 2018

SOURCE: Radiological Society of North America.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on July 30, 2018

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