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What questions should you ask when you take a part in a clinical trial for arthritis?

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A clinical trial tests how well a new treatment might work. If you’re thinking about enrolling, you may want to ask:

  • What is the purpose of the clinical trial?
  • What kinds of tests and treatments does the clinical trial involve?
  • How are these tests given?
  • What is likely to happen in my case with, or without, this new research treatment? Are there standard treatment options for my arthritis, and how does the study treatment compare with them?
  • How could the clinical trial affect my daily life?
  • What side effects can I expect from the clinical trial? (Note: There can also be side effects from standard arthritis treatments and from the disease itself.)
  • How long will the clinical trial last?
  • Will the clinical trial require extra time on my part?
  • Will I have to be hospitalized? If so, how often and for how long?
  • If I agree to withdraw from the clinical trial, will my care be affected? Will I need to change doctors?

SOURCES:

ClinicalTrials.gov

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

SOURCES:

ClinicalTrials.gov

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 13, 2018

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How do counterirritants help in treating arthritis?

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