PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What’s an acupuncture session like?

ANSWER

You’ll have a first appointment to go over your condition. The acupuncturist should tell you how many treatments you’ll need. Six to eight sessions is typical.

At each session, the acupuncturist will put very thin needles into various places in your skin. Most people say they feel little pain, though it’s common to feel pressure or a slight ache once the needles are in. The acupuncturist might apply heat or electrical current to the needles, or gently move them.

The needles stay in for 10 to 20 minutes. During that time, you lie still. Then the acupuncturist takes them out. Removal doesn’t hurt.

SOURCES:

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Acupuncture in Depth.”

Mayo Clinic: “Acupuncture.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Acupuncture for Arthritis,” “Osteoarthritis,” “Rheumatoid Arthritis,” “Fibromyalgia,” “Gout.”

Arthritis & Rheumatology : “2019 American College of Rheumatology/Arthritis Foundation Guideline for the Management of Osteoarthritis of the Hand, Hip, and Knee.”

Evidence-Based Alternative and Complementary Medicine : “Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture on Rheumatoid Arthritis and Associated Mechanisms: A Systemic Review.”

Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine : “Efficacy of Acupuncture on Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.”

Spondylitis Association of America: “Overview of Ankylosing Spondylitis.” 

Medicina Clinica : “Efficacy of Acupuncture in Rheumatic Diseases With Spinal Involvement: Systematic Review.”

Lupus Foundation of America: “How Lupus Differs from Arthritis.”

Current Rheumatology Reports : “Updated Review of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.”

Rheumatology : “Acupuncture for gouty arthritis: a concise report of a systematic and meta-analysis approach.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Acupuncture.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 12, 2020

SOURCES:

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Acupuncture in Depth.”

Mayo Clinic: “Acupuncture.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Acupuncture for Arthritis,” “Osteoarthritis,” “Rheumatoid Arthritis,” “Fibromyalgia,” “Gout.”

Arthritis & Rheumatology : “2019 American College of Rheumatology/Arthritis Foundation Guideline for the Management of Osteoarthritis of the Hand, Hip, and Knee.”

Evidence-Based Alternative and Complementary Medicine : “Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture on Rheumatoid Arthritis and Associated Mechanisms: A Systemic Review.”

Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine : “Efficacy of Acupuncture on Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.”

Spondylitis Association of America: “Overview of Ankylosing Spondylitis.” 

Medicina Clinica : “Efficacy of Acupuncture in Rheumatic Diseases With Spinal Involvement: Systematic Review.”

Lupus Foundation of America: “How Lupus Differs from Arthritis.”

Current Rheumatology Reports : “Updated Review of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.”

Rheumatology : “Acupuncture for gouty arthritis: a concise report of a systematic and meta-analysis approach.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Acupuncture.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 12, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

What are the risks of acupuncture for arthritis?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.