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Who might benefit from shoulder replacement surgery?

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You may have to have it done if you have a condition that makes it painful and hard to use your arm, such as:

Your doctor will probably try to treat you with drugs or physical therapy first. If those don’t work, he may recommend surgery.

Shoulder replacement surgery is less common than hip or knee replacements. But more than 50,000 shoulder replacements are done in the U.S. each year.

  • A serious shoulder injury like a broken bone
  • Severe arthritis
  • A torn rotator cuff

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Shoulder Joint Replacement.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Total Shoulder Replacement.”

The Arthritis Foundation: “Shoulder Surgery.”

Emory Healthcare: “Total Shoulder Arthroplasty.”

University of Washington School of Orthoaedics and Sports Medicine: “Total Shoulder Replacement,” “Shoulder Joint Replacement at the University of Washington.”

California Pacific Medical Center: “Partial Shoulder Replacement - Basics.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Recovering from Shoulder Replacement Surgery.”

Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery: “Outcomes after shoulder replacement: comparison between reverse and anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on December 21, 2017

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Shoulder Joint Replacement.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Total Shoulder Replacement.”

The Arthritis Foundation: “Shoulder Surgery.”

Emory Healthcare: “Total Shoulder Arthroplasty.”

University of Washington School of Orthoaedics and Sports Medicine: “Total Shoulder Replacement,” “Shoulder Joint Replacement at the University of Washington.”

California Pacific Medical Center: “Partial Shoulder Replacement - Basics.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Recovering from Shoulder Replacement Surgery.”

Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery: “Outcomes after shoulder replacement: comparison between reverse and anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on December 21, 2017

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How should you prepare for shoulder replacement surgery?

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