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How can my workplace help me with my occupational asthma?

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OSHA (the Occupational Safety and Health Administration) is a government agency that has created guidelines that determine acceptable levels of exposure to substances that may cause asthma. Employers are required to follow these rules.

However, if in a particular job, exposure to asthma triggers is unavoidable, most employers are willing to assist the employee to find a more suitable workplace. Once it has been determined what causes your asthma, discuss with your health care provider how best to approach your employer and what precautions need to be taken.

SOURCES:
U.S. Department of Labor: "Safety and Health Topics: Occupational Asthma."
American Lung Association: "Occupational Asthma." 
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Occupational Asthma" and "Show Occupational Asthma Who’s Boss."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on June 14, 2020

SOURCES:
U.S. Department of Labor: "Safety and Health Topics: Occupational Asthma."
American Lung Association: "Occupational Asthma." 
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Occupational Asthma" and "Show Occupational Asthma Who’s Boss."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on June 14, 2020

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