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How is bronchial asthma treated?

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Once diagnosed, your health care provider will recommend asthma medication (which can include asthma inhalers and pills) and lifestyle changes to treat and prevent asthma attacks. For example, long-acting anti-inflammatory asthma inhalers are often necessary to treat the inflammation associated with asthma. These inhalers deliver low doses of steroids to the lungs with minimal side effects if used properly. The fast-acting or "rescue" bronchodilator inhaler works immediately on opening airways during an asthma attack. If you have bronchial asthma, make sure your health care provider shows you how to use the inhalers properly. Be sure to keep your rescue inhaler with you in case of an asthma attack or asthma emergency. While there is no asthma cure yet, there are excellent asthma medications that can help with preventing asthma symptoms. Asthma support groups are also available to help you better cope with your asthma.

From: Bronchial Asthma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Smolley, L , New York, Dell, 1998. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: "Expert Panel Report 3 (EPR 3): Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma." Global Initiative for Asthma Management and Prevention. NHLBI/WHO Workshop Report, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, 1995; Pub #95-3659. CDC: FastStats: "Asthma." American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Trends in Allergic Disease."





. Breathe Right Now

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 11, 2019

SOURCES: Smolley, L , New York, Dell, 1998. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: "Expert Panel Report 3 (EPR 3): Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma." Global Initiative for Asthma Management and Prevention. NHLBI/WHO Workshop Report, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, 1995; Pub #95-3659. CDC: FastStats: "Asthma." American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Trends in Allergic Disease."





. Breathe Right Now

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 11, 2019

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What should you know about having an asthma attack?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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