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What are short-acting bronchodilators?

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Short-acting bronchodilators are called "quick-acting," "reliever," or "rescue" medications. They ease sudden asthma symptoms or attacks very quickly by opening the airways. They start to work within minutes and their effects last for two to four hours. Your doctor may recommend short-acting bronchodilators before exercise to prevent exercise-induced asthma. You can use short-acting bronchodilators in an asthma nebulizer in the form of a liquid to treat an asthma attack at home.

SOURCES: National Jewish Medical and Research Center: "Inhaled Medication with a Metered Dose Inhaler (MDI)."  Asthma Society of Canada: "How to Use Your Inhaler." Science Daily: "New Asthma Inhaler Propellant Effective, but Costlier." Children's Hospital Boston: "Allergy Treatment." Boehringer Ingelheim: "US FDA Expands Approval of Tiotropium Respimat® for Maintenance Treatment of Asthma in Children." FDA. Prescribing Information: Spiriva Respimat.
American Academy of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology: "Asthma" and "Allergy and Asthma Drug Guide."






Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on May 12, 2019

SOURCES: National Jewish Medical and Research Center: "Inhaled Medication with a Metered Dose Inhaler (MDI)."  Asthma Society of Canada: "How to Use Your Inhaler." Science Daily: "New Asthma Inhaler Propellant Effective, but Costlier." Children's Hospital Boston: "Allergy Treatment." Boehringer Ingelheim: "US FDA Expands Approval of Tiotropium Respimat® for Maintenance Treatment of Asthma in Children." FDA. Prescribing Information: Spiriva Respimat.
American Academy of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology: "Asthma" and "Allergy and Asthma Drug Guide."






Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on May 12, 2019

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What are some short-acting bronchodilator inhalers available in the United States?

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