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What are the common asthma triggers?

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  • Allergies
  • Tobacco smoke
  • Air pollution, chemical fumes, or other substances in the air. Even something like strong household cleaners and perfume could be a trigger for some people.
  • A cold or upper respiratory infection, the flu, and sinusitis (inflammation or swelling of your sinuses)
  • Acid reflux, with or without heartburn
  • Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen
  • Some beta-blocker medications, which treat heart disease, high blood pressure, migraine, and glaucoma
  • Exercise
  • Very cold or dry weather, or changes in the weather
  • Stress and anxiety

From: What Are Your Severe Asthma Triggers? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “Allergy Symptoms,” “Asthma Attack.”

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “Asthma Triggers and Management.”

Deutsches Arzteblatt International: “Severe Asthma: Definition, Diagnosis and Treatment.”

Asthma.net: “Strong Emotions, Stress, and Depression.”

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on December 20, 2017

SOURCES:

American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “Allergy Symptoms,” “Asthma Attack.”

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “Asthma Triggers and Management.”

Deutsches Arzteblatt International: “Severe Asthma: Definition, Diagnosis and Treatment.”

Asthma.net: “Strong Emotions, Stress, and Depression.”

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on December 20, 2017

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What are the warning signs of a potential asthma attack?

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