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What food preservatives can trigger asthma attack?

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Food preservatives can trigger an asthma attack. Additives, such as sodium bisulfite, potassium bisulfite, sodium metabisulfite, potassium metabisulfite, and sodium sulfite, are commonly used in packaged and prepared foods, including:

  • Dried fruits or vegetables
  • Potatoes (packaged and some prepared)
  • Wine and beer
  • Bottled lime or lemon juice
  • Shrimp (fresh, frozen, or prepared)
  • Pickled foods

SOURCES:  The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network: "Frequently Asked Questions."  Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: "Food Allergies."

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 18, 2019

SOURCES:  The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network: "Frequently Asked Questions."  Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: "Food Allergies."

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 18, 2019

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What are usual symptoms of food allergies that will lead to asthma?

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