PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What kind of information should I record in my eosinophilic asthma diary?

ANSWER

You should include these things in your eosinophilic asthma diary:

  • The date and time
  • Your zones (green, yellow, or red, depending on the how severe your symptoms are)
  • Peak expiratory flow, which measures how well your lungs work
  • What you were doing at the time
  • How often your symptoms happen and how strong they are
  • How often you have to use bronchodilators, such as rescue medication, and how well it worked
  • Number of emergency visits
  • Missed workdays
  • Any other factors, such as travel, new mediations, and other changes that might have affected your asthma

SOURCES:

American Partnership for Eosinophilic Disorders: “Eosinophilic Asthma.”

Chih-Yin Yeh, board-certified allergist and immunologist, Atlanta.

Cleveland Clinic: “Asthma Management: Management and Treatment.”

Current Medical Research and Opinion: “Primary care of asthma: new options for severe

eosinophilic asthma,” “Asthma.”

Global Initiative for Asthma: “Asthma in adults: Creating an asthma action plan,” “Improvement in Asthma Control Using a Minimally Burdensome and Proactive Smartphone Application.”

KidsHealth: “What's an Asthma Action Plan?”

Mayo Clinic: “Asthma in adults: Creating an asthma action plan.”

Nationwide Children’s: “Asthma Symptom Diary.”

PropellerHealth.com.

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice: “Improvement in Asthma Control Using a Minimally Burdensome and Proactive Smartphone Application.”

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on February 27, 2020

SOURCES:

American Partnership for Eosinophilic Disorders: “Eosinophilic Asthma.”

Chih-Yin Yeh, board-certified allergist and immunologist, Atlanta.

Cleveland Clinic: “Asthma Management: Management and Treatment.”

Current Medical Research and Opinion: “Primary care of asthma: new options for severe

eosinophilic asthma,” “Asthma.”

Global Initiative for Asthma: “Asthma in adults: Creating an asthma action plan,” “Improvement in Asthma Control Using a Minimally Burdensome and Proactive Smartphone Application.”

KidsHealth: “What's an Asthma Action Plan?”

Mayo Clinic: “Asthma in adults: Creating an asthma action plan.”

Nationwide Children’s: “Asthma Symptom Diary.”

PropellerHealth.com.

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice: “Improvement in Asthma Control Using a Minimally Burdensome and Proactive Smartphone Application.”

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on February 27, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

Can you have a healthy pregnancy and have asthma?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: