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What types of flu vaccines are available for people with asthma?

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Two types of flu vaccine exist - a shot and a nasal spray.

Flu shots don't contain a live virus and cannot cause the flu. The nasal flu vaccine, called FluMist, contains weakened flu viruses, and does not cause flu. People with asthma should receive the flu shot vaccine, not FluMist.

Other options include:

  • Intradermal shots use smaller needles that only go into the top layer of the skin instead of the muscle. They are available for those ages 18 to 64.
  • Egg-free vaccines are now available for those ages 18 to 49 who have severe egg allergies.
  • High-dose vaccines are meant for those age 65 and older and may better protect them from the flu.

From: Asthma and Flu WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

CDC: "Estimating Seasonal Influenza-Associated Deaths in the United States: CDC Study Confirms Variability of Flu." National Jewish Medical and Research Center: "Asthma Patients Urged to Get Flu Vaccine" and "Respiratory Viruses Can Trigger Asthma Attacks." Mayo Clinic: "Asthma: Cold and Flu Action Plan." American Academy of Family Physicians: "The Flu."


Reviewed by William Blahd on January 03, 2017

SOURCES:

CDC: "Estimating Seasonal Influenza-Associated Deaths in the United States: CDC Study Confirms Variability of Flu." National Jewish Medical and Research Center: "Asthma Patients Urged to Get Flu Vaccine" and "Respiratory Viruses Can Trigger Asthma Attacks." Mayo Clinic: "Asthma: Cold and Flu Action Plan." American Academy of Family Physicians: "The Flu."


Reviewed by William Blahd on January 03, 2017

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How do flu vaccines work in people with asthma?

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