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When do you need a long-term controller medicine to manage asthma?

ANSWER

You’ll probably need to take one of these daily medicines if you have symptoms more than twice a week. They come in two forms: anti-inflammatory drugs and bronchodilators.

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “How is Asthma Treated and Controlled?”

Palo Alto Medical Foundation: “Controller Medications.”

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: “Asthma Overview.”

American Lung Association: “Understand Your Medication.”

The Asthma Center: “Controller vs. Reliever Medications.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control.”

National Jewish Health: “Bronchial Thermoplasty.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Asthma Treatments.”

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: “Allergy Shots (Allergy Immunotherapy).”

Asthma Symptoms: “Asthma Treatment – Quick Relief Medications – Ipratropium /Atrovent.”

Brown University: “Asthma.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 22, 2017

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “How is Asthma Treated and Controlled?”

Palo Alto Medical Foundation: “Controller Medications.”

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: “Asthma Overview.”

American Lung Association: “Understand Your Medication.”

The Asthma Center: “Controller vs. Reliever Medications.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control.”

National Jewish Health: “Bronchial Thermoplasty.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Asthma Treatments.”

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: “Allergy Shots (Allergy Immunotherapy).”

Asthma Symptoms: “Asthma Treatment – Quick Relief Medications – Ipratropium /Atrovent.”

Brown University: “Asthma.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 22, 2017

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What is bronchial thermoplasty for asthma?

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