Feeling Your Baby Kick

Video Transcript

FamilyDoctor.org: "Your Baby's Development: The Second Trimester."

Wondering when you'll feel your baby moving inside you, and what she's up to in there? Here are of the most-asked questions and answers. Question -- How soon will I feel my baby fluttering around? If you're a first-time mom-to-be, you might not feel your little one move 'til weeks 18-25. Maybe as soon as 13-16 weeks into your pregnancy -- if you've had kids before. At first it might feel like you're having gas, but once you notice a pattern to the flutters, that'll tell you it's your little one on the move. What kind of acrobatics is my baby up to? Early on she's stretching or flexing her little limbs. Later in the pregnancy you may feel her kick, punch, or roll! That helps her muscles get stronger. What things make her move around? She might react to noises she hears you make, or she may squirm when you're in a position that's uncomfy for her. Other times, she might simply be waking up. Should I count my baby's kicks? If your doctor asks you to. Otherwise, you don't have to track it. Dwelling on the kick count could make you anxious. If you think your little one might be moving around less than usual, check in with your doctor to ease your worries.

One of the most exciting moments in your pregnancy is when you feel those first little flutters of your baby kicking. These tiny movements reassure you that your baby is developing and help you feel closer to the little life inside of you.

When Will I Feel My Baby Kicking?

You should feel your baby's first movements, called "quickening," between weeks 16 and 25 of your pregnancy. If this is your first pregnancy, you may not feel your baby move until closer to 25 weeks. By the second pregnancy, some women start to feel movements as early as 13 weeks. You're more likely to feel baby move when you're in a quiet position, either sitting or lying down.

What Does the Baby's Kicking Feel Like?

Pregnant women describe their baby's movements as butterflies, nervous twitches, or a tumbling motion. At first, it may be hard to tell whether your baby has moved. Second- and third-time moms are more adept at distinguishing those first baby movements fromgas,hungerpangs, and other internal motions.

By your second and third trimesters, the movements should be more distinct, and you'll be able to feel your baby's kicks, jabs, and elbows.

How Often Should I Feel My Baby Moving?

Early in your pregnancy, you may just feel a few flutters every now and then. But as your baby grows -- usually by the end of the second trimester -- the kicks should grow stronger and more frequent. Studies show that by the third trimester, the baby moves about 30 times each hour.

Babies tend to move more at certain times of the day as they alternate between alertness and sleep. They are usually most active between 9 p.m. and 1 a.m., right as you're trying to get to sleep. This surge in activity is due to your changing blood sugar levels. Babies also can respond to sounds or touch, and may even kick your partner in the back if you snuggle too close in bed.

Should I Monitor My Baby's Kicking?

Once your baby's movements are well established (usually by week 28), some doctors recommend keeping track of all those little punches, jabs, and kicks to make sure your baby is still developing normally. There isn't any real scientific evidence to prove whether this method is a good indicator of the baby's well-being, so check with your health care provider to see what he or she recommends.

Continued

If you are counting, it helpsto chart your baby's kicks so that you can keep track of your baby's normal patterns of movement. To count movements, pick a time when your baby is usually most active (often, this is right after you've eaten a meal). Get into a comfortable position either sitting down in a comfortable chair or lying on your side.

Opinion varies as to how to count your baby's movements, but the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends noting the time it takes for your baby to make 10 movements. You should feel at least 10 movements within a two-hour period.

If you don't feel your baby move 10 times by the end of two hours, try again later in the day. Then if you still can't feel 10 movements in two hours, or your baby is much less active than normal, call your health care provider, who can check your baby's heart rate and movements.

If You Don't Feel Your Baby Moving

If you haven't yet reached 25 weeks and don't feel your baby move, or you're not sure that what you're feeling is actually your baby, don't panic. As your baby grows, you'll be able to better distinguish his or her movements. You'll also figure out at what times of the day your baby is most active. Some babies just naturally move less often than others.

A lack of movement also may mean that your baby is asleep. You may feel fewer kicks and jabs after the 32nd week as your baby gets bigger and has less room to move around in the uterus.

If your baby has started to move regularly and you don't feel at least 10 movements within a two-hour period, or the movements have slowed significantly, it's time to call your doctor.

Timeline of Baby Movement

Here is a guide to your baby's possible movements.

Week 12: Your baby should start to move, but you probably won't be able to feel anything, because the baby is still so small.

Week 16: Some pregnant women will start to feel tiny butterfly-like flutters. The feeling might just be gas, or it might be the baby moving.

Week 20: By this point in your baby's development, you may start to really feel your baby's first movements, called "quickening."

Week 24: The baby's movements are starting to become more established. You might also begin to feel slight twitches as your baby hiccups.

Week 28: Your baby is moving often now. Some of the kicks and jabs may take your breath away.

Week 36: Your uterus is getting crowded as the baby grows, and movements should slow down a bit. However, alert your healthcare provider if you notice significant changes in your baby’s usual activity. You should feel consistent movement throughout the day.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Kecia Gaither, MD, MPH on July 17, 2018

Sources

SOURCES:

American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists: "Special Tests for Monitoring Fetal Health."

Mangesi, L. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, published online, Jan. 24, 2007.

Gabbe, S.G., Niebyl, J.R., and Simpson, J.L. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies, Churchill Livingstone, 2007.

© 2018 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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