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  • Question 1/12

    Eating bananas will help you get pregnant faster.

  • Answer 1/12

    Eating bananas will help you get pregnant faster.

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    Maybe you heard that bananas boost fertility or yams make you more likely to have twins. But there isn't enough science that shows that any particular food helps his sperm meet your egg faster. Instead, aim to eat more fruits and veggies, whole grains, healthy fats, and different kinds of protein to keep your body healthy.

  • Question 1/12

    Age affects fertility in:

  • Answer 1/12

    Age affects fertility in:

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    It's true that some men can become new fathers in their 60s or later. But research shows their biological clocks tick, too. Women become less fertile after age 35. The reason: As they get older, they have fewer eggs, and the eggs become less healthy. Fertility changes in men don't happen as suddenly, but age can still affect a man's ability to have sex and the health of his sperm.

  • Question 1/12

    Cough syrup is proven to help you conceive.

  • Answer 1/12

    Cough syrup is proven to help you conceive.

    • You answered:
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    You might have heard these rumors. Some websites claim that an ingredient called guaifenesin in these medicines improves your cervical mucus, so it's easier for sperm to reach an egg. But there's no scientific evidence to back up that idea.

  • Question 1/12

    A fertile 30-year-old woman has a ___ chance of getting pregnant each month.

  • Answer 1/12

    A fertile 30-year-old woman has a ___ chance of getting pregnant each month.

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    That means for every 100 healthy 30-year-old women who try to make a baby this month, 20 will conceive. The other 80 can try again. Women are the most fertile in their 20s. More women are having babies later in life, compared with past decades, but the odds do drop after age 30. A pregnancy could still happen right up until you go into menopause, but with age, you might be more likely to need fertility treatment. 

  • Question 1/12

    You took birth control pills for years, so it will take a little longer for you to get pregnant.

  • Answer 1/12

    You took birth control pills for years, so it will take a little longer for you to get pregnant.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Most women ovulate again about 2 weeks after they stop the pill. As soon as your body releases an egg, you can get pregnant. One study looked at a large group of women who got off the pill to try to get pregnant. About 20% conceived in their first fertile month. That's about the same odds as women who didn't take the pill.


    Also, if you're worried you have a higher chance of miscarriage, don't be -- that's another myth.

  • Answer 1/12

    What’s the ideal weight to get pregnant?  

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    • Correct Answer:

    If you weigh too little, your menstrual cycle may become irregular. Or your body just may stop ovulating.

    Being overweight can have the same effect. Obesity is also linked to other issues that affect pregnancy, such as thyroid disease and diabetes.

    Not sure what you should weigh? Your doctor can help you figure that out at a preconception checkup.

  • Question 1/12

    Which of these can help you conceive?

  • Answer 1/12

    Which of these can help you conceive?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Go ahead and exercise, but not too much or too hard. If you do intense workouts more than 5 hours a week, you may ovulate less often. And as nice as it would be to orgasm every time you have sex, it won't help you get pregnant. What we know for sure: Smoking makes fertility problems more likely, makes you lose eggs faster, and can make sperm unhealthy. Quit today to better your chances of conceiving.

  • Question 1/12

    If you have sex closer to when you ovulate, your chance of having a boy are ___ your chance of having a girl.

  • Answer 1/12

    If you have sex closer to when you ovulate, your chance of having a boy are ___ your chance of having a girl.

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    You have a 50/50 chance of having a boy or a girl, no matter when in your cycle you have sex. The dad's sperm decides the gender. About half of his sperm will make a boy, and the other half will make a girl. The gender of your baby depends on which sperm reaches your egg first.

  • Question 1/12

    You should quit all caffeine to help you get pregnant.

  • Answer 1/12

    You should quit all caffeine to help you get pregnant.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can keep your chai latte or cappuccino. It's OK to have less than 200 milligrams of caffeine a day. That's equal to about one to two cups of coffee a day. (One cup is 8 ounces.) What you should stop drinking is alcohol. Having one or more drinks a day may make it harder to get pregnant.

  • Question 1/12

    You should see a fertility specialist after trying to get pregnant for:

  • Answer 1/12

    You should see a fertility specialist after trying to get pregnant for:

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    That's what the experts recommend if you're younger than 35 and you and your partner are healthy. Give baby-making your best effort for 12 months before seeing a doctor. Healthy women older than 35 should talk with their doctor after trying for 6 months. Infertility affects both men and women, and treatment can help.

  • Question 1/12

    Which of the following is true about infertility?

  • Answer 1/12

    Which of the following is true about infertility?

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    In infertile couples, the odds that infertility has something to do with the woman are the same as for the man. It's a physical condition, and stress doesn't cause it. Adoption doesn't solve it. Couples who adopt aren't more likely to get pregnant later on than those who don't.

  • Question 1/12

    You have one baby, so you can definitely have another.

  • Answer 1/12

    You have one baby, so you can definitely have another.

    • You answered:
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    Hopefully, you'll be able to have a successful pregnancy again, if you choose. But infertility can happen after your first or second child. Doctors call it secondary infertility -- it may be surprising, but it's also common. Age could be a cause, and so could damaged fallopian tubes, problems with ovulation or the making of sperm, or other issues.

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Sources | Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson, MD on January 26, 2019 Medically Reviewed on January 26, 2019

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson, MD on
January 26, 2019

SOURCES:

American Society for Reproductive Medicine: "Optimizing Natural Fertility," "Age and  Fertility," " Weight and Fertility," “Smoking and Infertility.”

New England Journal of Medicine: "Timing of Sexual Intercourse in Relation to Ovulation -- Effects on the Probability of Conception, Survival of the Pregnancy, and Sex of the Baby."

Mayo Clinic: "How to Get Pregnant," "Birth Control Pill FAQ," "Low Sperm Count," "Is there any way to influence a baby's sex?" “Secondary Infertility: Why does it happen?” “Getting Pregnant.”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Fertility Awareness-Based Methods of Family Planning," "Evaluating Infertility."

Reviews in Urology: “Fertility and the Aging Male.”

CDC: National Vital Statistics Reports.

Obstetrics and Gynecology: "Rate of pregnancy after using drospirenone and other progestin-containing oral contraceptives."

Animal Behaviour: "No direct relationship between human female orgasm rate and number of offspring."

News release, Genome Advance of the Month, National Human Genome Research Institute.

Obstetrics and Gynecology: “Iron intake and risk of Ovulatory Infertility.”

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: "Foods That Can Affect Fertility."

Resolve: The National Infertility Association: "How do I know if I have an infertility problem?” “Myths and Facts About Infertility,” “Myth about Secondary Infertility.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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