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How common are hemorrhoids in pregnancy?

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Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in your rectum that can cause itching, burning, pain, or bleeding. It's common to get them during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. You should call your doctor if yours bleed or hurt a lot.

You're more likely to get hemorrhoids if you're constipated, because straining to have a bowel movement swells your veins. Your growing baby also puts pressure on the large veins behind your uterus.

Hemorrhoids usually go away soon after your baby is born.

From: Hemorrhoids During Pregnancy WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Changes in Your Body During Pregnancy: Third Trimester."

March of Dimes: "Your Pregnant Body: Hemorrhoids."

Nemours Foundation: "Pregnancy Questions & Answers."

Staroselsky, A. , February 2008. Canadian Family Physician

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Managing Hemorrhoids and Varicose Veins in Pregnancy."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 07, 2016

SOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Changes in Your Body During Pregnancy: Third Trimester."

March of Dimes: "Your Pregnant Body: Hemorrhoids."

Nemours Foundation: "Pregnancy Questions & Answers."

Staroselsky, A. , February 2008. Canadian Family Physician

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Managing Hemorrhoids and Varicose Veins in Pregnancy."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 07, 2016

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How can you ease pressure from hemorrhoids in pregnancy?

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