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How common are teen pregnancies?

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The teen pregnancy rate (which includes pregnancies that end in a live birth and those that end in termination or miscarriage) has declined by 51 percent since 1991. It's gone from 116.9 to 57.4 pregnancies per 1,000 teenage girls ages 15 to 19. Abstinence and the use of birth control are factors in the decrease, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

U.S. teen birth rates have also declined. In 2015, a total of 229,715 babies were born to women ages 15 to 19, for a birth rate of 22.3 per 1,000 women in this age group, an 8-percent drop from 2014.

Still, the teen birth rate in the U.S. remains significantly higher than in other developed countries, according to the CDC.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: "Pregnancy."

Nemours Foundation: "When Your Teen Is Having a Baby."

Medline Plus: "Teenage Pregnancy."

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG): "Especially for Teens: Having a Baby."

Simpson, K. R., Creehan, P. A., and the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). Perinatal Nursing, 2nd edition, Lippincott, 2001.

WebMD Medical News: "Postpartum Depression: How Common?"

National Center for Health Statistics: ''Vital Signs: Teen Pregnancy -- United States, 1991-2009.''

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: ''Fast Facts: Teen Pregnancy in the United States.''

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

 Centers for Disease Control: "Teen Pregnancy in the United States."

Department of Health and Human Services - HHS.gov Office of Adolescent Health: "Trends in Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on July 8, 2020

SOURCES:

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: "Pregnancy."

Nemours Foundation: "When Your Teen Is Having a Baby."

Medline Plus: "Teenage Pregnancy."

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG): "Especially for Teens: Having a Baby."

Simpson, K. R., Creehan, P. A., and the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). Perinatal Nursing, 2nd edition, Lippincott, 2001.

WebMD Medical News: "Postpartum Depression: How Common?"

National Center for Health Statistics: ''Vital Signs: Teen Pregnancy -- United States, 1991-2009.''

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: ''Fast Facts: Teen Pregnancy in the United States.''

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

 Centers for Disease Control: "Teen Pregnancy in the United States."

Department of Health and Human Services - HHS.gov Office of Adolescent Health: "Trends in Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on July 8, 2020

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