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How should women expect mood swings after a C-section?

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C-section, or cesarean section, is a surgery to deliver a baby through a cut in the mother’s belly and womb. You’ll stay in the hospital for 2-3 days. After you bring your baby home, you may find yourself going through a roller coaster of emotions. You might feel worried, anxious, or very tired during the first few weeks of motherhood. Called the “baby blues,” this comes from hormone changes. If you feel this way beyond a couple of weeks, though, call your doctor. You may have postpartum depression, a more serious condition that happens in about 15% of all new moms. Talk therapy or antidepressants can usually help.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Health: “What is a Cesarean Delivery?”

Mayo Clinic: “C-section What You Can Expect,” “C-section Recovery: What to Expect.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Breastfeeding After Cesarean Delivery.”

Kaiser Permanente: “Recovery After a Cesarean Birth.”

University of Rochester Medical Center Obstetrics Division: “Pain Management.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Cesarean Section.”

American Psychological Association: “What is postpartum depression & anxiety?”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on June 24, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute of Health: “What is a Cesarean Delivery?”

Mayo Clinic: “C-section What You Can Expect,” “C-section Recovery: What to Expect.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Breastfeeding After Cesarean Delivery.”

Kaiser Permanente: “Recovery After a Cesarean Birth.”

University of Rochester Medical Center Obstetrics Division: “Pain Management.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Cesarean Section.”

American Psychological Association: “What is postpartum depression & anxiety?”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on June 24, 2019

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What are tips for women to heal faster after a C-section?

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