PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Is pregnancy massage safe?

ANSWER

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine advises that pregnant women talk with their doctor before trying massage.

There's no nationwide certification standards, and not all states have laws requiring a set minimum training for a massage therapist, regardless of whether or not the client is pregnant. And massage therapy during pregnancy hasn't been studied with high-quality research. There are no scientifically agreed-upon guidelines.

You may need to provide written consent from your doctor and a liability waiver from you. Because of the possibility of miscarriage, many massage therapists won't give pregnancy massages during the first trimester.

SOURCES:

Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals: "Pregnancy Massage."

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: "Massage Therapy as CAM."

Ontario Massage Therapist Association: "Massage Therapy: Literature Review on Pregnancy and Massage."

Swedish Medical Center: "Mommy Massage: For a Healthy, Relaxed Pregnancy."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 15, 2019

SOURCES:

Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals: "Pregnancy Massage."

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: "Massage Therapy as CAM."

Ontario Massage Therapist Association: "Massage Therapy: Literature Review on Pregnancy and Massage."

Swedish Medical Center: "Mommy Massage: For a Healthy, Relaxed Pregnancy."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 15, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

Who shouldn't get pregnancy massage?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: