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What do studies say about water birth?

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Studies show water birth during stage one of labor doesn’t improve your or your baby’s medical outcome.

A warm bath might help you relax and help you feel more in control. Floating in water helps you move around more easily than in bed, too.

Some science suggests that the water may lower chances of severe vaginal tearing. And it may improve blood flow to the uterus. But study results about these points aren’t clear.

From: The Basics of Water Birth WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on September 07, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 09/07/2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics, , March 2014. Pediatrics

American Association of Birth Centers.

American College of Nurse-Midwives.

American College of Nurse-Midwives: “Position Statement: Hydrotherapy During Labor and Birth.”

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Immersion in Water During Labor and Delivery.”

News release, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Aaron Caughey, MD, spokesperson, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; professor and chairman, department of obstetrics and gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University; associate dean for women’s health research and policy, Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine.

Jeffrey Ecker, MD, chairman, Committee on Obstetric Practice, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology, Harvard Medical School; director of obstetrical clinical research and quality assurance, Massachusetts General Hospital.

Nutter, E. , May 2014. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health

Oregon Health & Science University Center for Women’s Health.

Royal College of Midwives.

Jenna Shaw-Battista, PhD, certified nurse-midwife; associate education director, University of California, San Francisco.

University of Maryland Medical Center: “The Three Stages of Labor.”

Waterbirth International: “Waterbirth FAQ.”

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on September 07, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics, , March 2014. Pediatrics

American Association of Birth Centers.

American College of Nurse-Midwives.

American College of Nurse-Midwives: “Position Statement: Hydrotherapy During Labor and Birth.”

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Immersion in Water During Labor and Delivery.”

News release, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Aaron Caughey, MD, spokesperson, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; professor and chairman, department of obstetrics and gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University; associate dean for women’s health research and policy, Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine.

Jeffrey Ecker, MD, chairman, Committee on Obstetric Practice, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology, Harvard Medical School; director of obstetrical clinical research and quality assurance, Massachusetts General Hospital.

Nutter, E. , May 2014. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health

Oregon Health & Science University Center for Women’s Health.

Royal College of Midwives.

Jenna Shaw-Battista, PhD, certified nurse-midwife; associate education director, University of California, San Francisco.

University of Maryland Medical Center: “The Three Stages of Labor.”

Waterbirth International: “Waterbirth FAQ.”

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on September 07, 2018

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