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What happens after a miscarriage caused by a blighted ovum?

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If you have received a diagnosis of a blighted ovum, discuss with your doctor what to do next. Some women have a dilation and curretage (D and C). This surgical procedure involves dilating the cervix and removing the contents of the uterus. Because a D and C immediately removes any remaining tissue, it may help you with mental and physical closure. It may also be helpful if you want a pathologist to examine that tissue to confirm the reason for the miscarriage.

Using a medication such as misoprostol on an outpatient basis may be another option. However, it may take several days for your body to expel all tissue. With this medication, you may have more bleeding and side effects. With both options, you may have pain or cramping that can be treated.

Other women prefer to forego medical management or surgery. They choose to let their body pass the tissue by itself. This is mainly a personal decision, but discuss it with your doctor.

After a miscarriage, your doctor may recommend that you wait at least one to three menstrual cycles before trying to conceive again.

From: Blighted Ovum WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: American Pregnancy Association: "Miscarriage."  American Pregnancy Association: "Blighted Ovum." Deutchman, M. , June 1, 2009. National Institutes of Health: "Drug Offers Alternative to Surgical Treatment After Miscarriage."



American Family Physician

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on April 19, 2019

SOURCES: American Pregnancy Association: "Miscarriage."  American Pregnancy Association: "Blighted Ovum." Deutchman, M. , June 1, 2009. National Institutes of Health: "Drug Offers Alternative to Surgical Treatment After Miscarriage."



American Family Physician

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on April 19, 2019

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