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What is fetal heart rate monitoring?

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If you’re pregnant your doctor wants to make sure your baby is healthy and growing as he should. One of the ways she does that is to check the rate and rhythm of your baby’s heartbeat.

Fetal heart monitoring is part of every pregnancy checkup. It’s combined with other tests for a closer look if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or other conditions that could cause problems for you and your baby. Fetal heart rates also can help count your contractions and tell if you’re going into labor too early.

From: Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring: What to Expect WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on December 20, 2017

Medically Reviewed on 12/20/2017

SOURCES:

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Fetal heart rate monitoring during labor,” “Special tests for monitoring fetal health.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Fetal heart monitoring.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Monitoring baby’s heart rate during labor.”

American Family Physician : “Interpretation of the electronic fetal heart rate during labor.”

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on December 20, 2017

SOURCES:

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Fetal heart rate monitoring during labor,” “Special tests for monitoring fetal health.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Fetal heart monitoring.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Monitoring baby’s heart rate during labor.”

American Family Physician : “Interpretation of the electronic fetal heart rate during labor.”

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on December 20, 2017

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How is fetal heart rate monitoring done?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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