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What is horseshoe kidney?

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Horseshoe kidney, also called renal fusion, is a condition that starts before a child is born.

As a baby develops in the womb, his kidneys move into position just above the waist -- one on each side of the body. But sometimes that doesn’t happen as it should. Instead, the kidneys fuse together at their base, forming a U or horseshoe shape. It usually happens between weeks 7 and 9 of the pregnancy.

From: What Is Horseshoe Kidney? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Boston Children’s Hospital: “Horseshoe Kidney in Children,” “Horseshoe Kidney Symptoms & Causes,” “Treatments for Horseshoe Kidney in Children.” 

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Horseshoe Kidney (Renal Fusion) in Children.”

Merriam-Webster: “Genitourinary tract.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Symptoms & Causes of Kidney Stones in Children.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “What is a chromosome?” “What is DNA?” “Turner Syndrome,” “Trisomy 18.” 

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on January 23, 2018

SOURCES:

Boston Children’s Hospital: “Horseshoe Kidney in Children,” “Horseshoe Kidney Symptoms & Causes,” “Treatments for Horseshoe Kidney in Children.” 

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Horseshoe Kidney (Renal Fusion) in Children.”

Merriam-Webster: “Genitourinary tract.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Symptoms & Causes of Kidney Stones in Children.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “What is a chromosome?” “What is DNA?” “Turner Syndrome,” “Trisomy 18.” 

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on January 23, 2018

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How common is horseshoe kidney?

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