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What prenatal tests might you get during the second trimester of your pregnancy?

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Here are the prenatal tests that you may have in the second trimester of your pregnancy:

Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) and multiple marker screening: You usually have one or the other during the second trimester. This test is an optional genetic screening test and as with all screening tests, talk with your doctor about the pros and cons to see if it is right for you. The MSAFP test measures the level of alpha-fetoprotein, a protein produced by the fetus. Abnormal levels indicate the possibility (but not existence) of Down syndrome or a neural tube defect such as spina bifida, which can then be confirmed by ultrasound or amniocentesis.

SOURCES:
Gabbe: Obstetrics-Normal and Problem Pregnancies, 4th edition, 2002.
WebMD Medical Reference provided in collaboration with The Cleveland Clinic: "Pregnancy: Your Guide to Pregnancy."
WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise: "Rh Sensitization During Pregnancy;" "Doppler Ultrasound;" and "Fetoscopy."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on January 30, 2019

SOURCES:
Gabbe: Obstetrics-Normal and Problem Pregnancies, 4th edition, 2002.
WebMD Medical Reference provided in collaboration with The Cleveland Clinic: "Pregnancy: Your Guide to Pregnancy."
WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise: "Rh Sensitization During Pregnancy;" "Doppler Ultrasound;" and "Fetoscopy."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on January 30, 2019

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What does non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) screening check for?

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