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Which vaccines can I receive while I'm pregnant?

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The following vaccines are considered safe to give to pregnant women who may be at risk of infection:

  • Hepatitis B. Pregnant women at high risk for this disease who've tested negative for the virus can get this vaccine. It's used to protect the mother and baby against infection both before and after delivery. A series of three doses is needed for immunity. The 2nd and 3rd doses are given 1 and 6 months after the first dose.
  • Influenza (inactivated): This vaccine can prevent serious illness in the mother during pregnancy. All women who'll be pregnant (any trimester) during the flu season should be offered this vaccine. Talk to your doctor to see if this applies to you.
  • Tetanus/Diphtheria/Pertussis (Tdap): Tdap is recommended during pregnancy, preferably between 27 and 36 weeks’ gestation, to protect your baby from whooping cough. If not given during pregnancy, Tdap should be given right after the birth of your baby.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control.

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on September 07, 2017

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control.

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on September 07, 2017

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