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Do pregnant teens have higher odds of some pregnancy complications?

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Pregnant teens are more likely to get high blood pressure than pregnant women in their 20s or 30s. This is called pregnancy-induced hypertension.

They also have a higher risk of preeclampsia. This is a dangerous medical condition that combines high blood pressure with excess protein in the urine, swelling of a mother's hands and face, and organ damage.

The teen may need to take medications to control symptoms. But they can also disrupt the unborn baby's growth. And, they can lead to further pregnancy complications such as premature birth and low birth weight.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: "Pregnancy."

Nemours Foundation: "When Your Teen Is Having a Baby."

Medline Plus: "Teenage Pregnancy."

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG): "Especially for Teens: Having a Baby."

Simpson, K. R., Creehan, P. A., and the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). Perinatal Nursing, 2nd edition, Lippincott, 2001.

WebMD Medical News: "Postpartum Depression: How Common?"

National Center for Health Statistics: ''Vital Signs: Teen Pregnancy -- United States, 1991-2009.''

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: ''Fast Facts: Teen Pregnancy in the United States.''

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

 Centers for Disease Control: "Teen Pregnancy in the United States."

Department of Health and Human Services - HHS.gov Office of Adolescent Health: "Trends in Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on July 8, 2020

SOURCES:

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: "Pregnancy."

Nemours Foundation: "When Your Teen Is Having a Baby."

Medline Plus: "Teenage Pregnancy."

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG): "Especially for Teens: Having a Baby."

Simpson, K. R., Creehan, P. A., and the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). Perinatal Nursing, 2nd edition, Lippincott, 2001.

WebMD Medical News: "Postpartum Depression: How Common?"

National Center for Health Statistics: ''Vital Signs: Teen Pregnancy -- United States, 1991-2009.''

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: ''Fast Facts: Teen Pregnancy in the United States.''

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

 Centers for Disease Control: "Teen Pregnancy in the United States."

Department of Health and Human Services - HHS.gov Office of Adolescent Health: "Trends in Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on July 8, 2020

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