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Are there any home remedies for spinal stenosis pain?

ANSWER

You can try:

  • Exercise. Just a 30-minute walk every other day can help. Talk over any new exercise plan with your doctor.
  • Heat and cold. Heat loosens up your muscles. Cold helps heal inflammation. Use one or the other on your neck or lower back. Hot showers are also good.
  • Good posture. Stand up straight, sit on a supportive chair, and sleep on a firm mattress. When you lift heavy objects, bend from your knees, not your back.
  • Lose weight. Extra pounds put more pressure on your back.

From: Cervical Spinal Stenosis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Spinal Stenosis”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public,” “Questions and Answers about Spinal Stenosis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Lumbar Spinal Stenosis,” “Spine Basics,” “Effects of Aging,” “About Us.”

Neuroscience Online, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center Houston: “Chapter 3: Anatomy of the Spinal Cord.”

American College of Rheumatology: “Spinal Stenosis,” “What is a Rheumatologist?”

Mayo Clinic: “Spinal stenosis,” “CT scan.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Osteoarthritis.”

Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center: “Spinal Stenosis.”

American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: “What is a Physiatrist?”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on October 17, 2018

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Spinal Stenosis”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public,” “Questions and Answers about Spinal Stenosis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Lumbar Spinal Stenosis,” “Spine Basics,” “Effects of Aging,” “About Us.”

Neuroscience Online, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center Houston: “Chapter 3: Anatomy of the Spinal Cord.”

American College of Rheumatology: “Spinal Stenosis,” “What is a Rheumatologist?”

Mayo Clinic: “Spinal stenosis,” “CT scan.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Osteoarthritis.”

Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center: “Spinal Stenosis.”

American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: “What is a Physiatrist?”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on October 17, 2018

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What is stenosis of the spine?

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