PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is congenital scoliosis?

ANSWER

This condition begins as a baby’s back develops before birth. Problems with the tiny bones in the back, called vertebrae, can cause the spine to curve. The vertebrae may be incomplete or fail to divide properly. Doctors don't usually find this condition until the child is born. Or, they may not notice it until the teen years.

From: What Is Scoliosis and What Causes It? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Scoliosis Research Society: “Frequently Asked Questions,” “Scoliosis,” “Diagnosing Scoliosis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Introduction to Scoliosis,” “Congenital Scoliosis.”

The Spine Hospital at the Neurological Institute of New York: “Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis,” “Degenerative Scoliosis.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Questions and Answers about Scoliosis in Children and Adolescents,” What Is Scoliosis?”, “Preventing Musculoskeletal Sports Injuries in Youth: A Guide for Parents.”

American Family Physician: “Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Diagnosis and Management.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on October 26, 2018

SOURCES:

Scoliosis Research Society: “Frequently Asked Questions,” “Scoliosis,” “Diagnosing Scoliosis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Introduction to Scoliosis,” “Congenital Scoliosis.”

The Spine Hospital at the Neurological Institute of New York: “Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis,” “Degenerative Scoliosis.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Questions and Answers about Scoliosis in Children and Adolescents,” What Is Scoliosis?”, “Preventing Musculoskeletal Sports Injuries in Youth: A Guide for Parents.”

American Family Physician: “Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Diagnosis and Management.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on October 26, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

When does scoliosis most often show up?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: