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What is TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation)?

ANSWER

TENS, or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, is a pain treatment that uses low voltage electric current to scramble pain signals in your body.

TENS is typically done with a TENS unit, a small battery-operated device. The device can be hooked to a belt and is connected to two electrodes. The electrodes carry an electric current from the TENS machine to the skin.

From: TENS for Back Pain WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

NYU: "Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)."

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center: "Nonsurgical Treatments for Spine Conditions."

ArthritisToday.org: "Non-Drug Treatments to Ease Osteoarthritis Pain."

Walnut Creek Chiropractic: "BV Medical Back Pain Relief TENS Support Belt."

Macalester College: "Conventional Pain Treatments."

The Cochrane Collaboration: "Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) versus placebo for chronic low-back pain."

The Ohio State University Medical Center: "TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation)."

Chou, R. October 2, 2007. Annals of Internal Medicine,

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on October 24, 2017

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

NYU: "Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)."

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center: "Nonsurgical Treatments for Spine Conditions."

ArthritisToday.org: "Non-Drug Treatments to Ease Osteoarthritis Pain."

Walnut Creek Chiropractic: "BV Medical Back Pain Relief TENS Support Belt."

Macalester College: "Conventional Pain Treatments."

The Cochrane Collaboration: "Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) versus placebo for chronic low-back pain."

The Ohio State University Medical Center: "TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation)."

Chou, R. October 2, 2007. Annals of Internal Medicine,

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on October 24, 2017

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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