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Are there any precautions with acupressure?

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In general, acupressure is very safe. If you have cancer, arthritis, heart disease, or a chronic condition, talk to your doctor before trying any therapy that involves moving joints and muscles, such as acupressure. And, make sure your acupressure practitioner is licensed and certified.

Deep tissue work such as acupressure may need to be avoided if any of the following conditions apply:

  • The treatment is in the area of a cancerous tumor or if the cancer has spread to bones
  • You have rheumatoid arthritis, a spinal injury, or a bone disease that could be made worse by physical manipulation
  • You have varicose veins
  • You are pregnant (because certain points may induce contractions)

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Acupressure, Shiatsu, and Other Asian Bodywork."

American Pain Foundation: "Treatment Options: A Guide for People Living with Pain."

Memorial Sloan Kettering: Acupressure

Memorial Sloan Kettering: Cancer

NIH NCCAM: "Energy Medicine: An Overview."

Natural Standard: ''Acupressure, shiatsu, tuina,'' 2013.

 

Reviewed by David Kiefer on October 21, 2017

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Acupressure, Shiatsu, and Other Asian Bodywork."

American Pain Foundation: "Treatment Options: A Guide for People Living with Pain."

Memorial Sloan Kettering: Acupressure

Memorial Sloan Kettering: Cancer

NIH NCCAM: "Energy Medicine: An Overview."

Natural Standard: ''Acupressure, shiatsu, tuina,'' 2013.

 

Reviewed by David Kiefer on October 21, 2017

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