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Should I tell my doctor about my worrying?

ANSWER

Yes, if worry affects your everyday life. Your doctor can check on what the causes may be, recommend counseling, and talk to you about whether you need r lifestyle changes and possibly medication to help feel less anxious.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: “Anxiety Disorders” and "Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)."

Anxiety Disorders Association of America: “Brief Overview of Anxiety Disorders.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Generalized Anxiety Disorder.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on September 12, 2020

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: “Anxiety Disorders” and "Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)."

Anxiety Disorders Association of America: “Brief Overview of Anxiety Disorders.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Generalized Anxiety Disorder.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on September 12, 2020

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How can exercising help with worrying?

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